Newsletter: Fintech Meets Climate Data

 

 

Four Twenty Seven’s monthly newsletter highlights recent developments in climate adaptation and resilience. This month, don’t miss a discussion with our new Chief Development Officer, our report on using climate data and cool new innovations in climate science!

In Focus: Fintech Meets Climate Data

Meet Chief Development Officer, Frank Freitas

We chatted with our new Chief Development Officer, Frank Freitas, about his motivations to join Four Twenty Seven after almost 30 years in finance and fintech, and his vision for new products and markets in climate analytics. Having spent his career developing award-winning solutions for global institutional investors, Frank is a seasoned veteran of product management and strategic planning.

He founded and sold Pluribus Labs, a research and analytics firm focused on the translation of unstructured data into investable signals. Before that, he served as Chief Operating Officer and Head of Product Strategy at Instinet, a leading technology-levered agency broker. He started his career in Product Management, designing and leading the delivery of quantitative risk solutions at Barra (now MSCI). “The acceleration of climate’s influence on corporate performance is upon us, and investors are rapidly awakening to the risks that climate change brings to financial markets,” Frank says. “Four Twenty Seven’s sophisticated climate data analytics are at the forefront of identifying most exposed corporations and assets globally, and we will continue to build on our expertise to provide best-in-class analytics of climate risk for our clients globally.”

 

Inside Market Data covers Frank’s transition to Four Twenty Seven and highlights the company’s goals for this year, including a focus on incorporating new types of data to add nuance to our risk analyses.

Read the Interview

Using Climate Data for Investment Decisions

Using Climate Data: A Four Twenty Seven Report


In this new Four Twenty Seven report, we demystify climate data with a clear breakdown of what it is, where it comes from and the nuances to consider when choosing which data products to use. Understanding the risks posed by climate change for facilities or infrastructure assets starts with conducting a risk assessment, which requires an understanding of the physical impacts of climate change. However, for unfamiliar users, climate data is hard to integrate into enterprise risk management, financial risk modelling processes and risk analysis.This climate data primer serves as an introduction for financial, corporate and government stakeholders striving to understand their exposure to physical climate change.

Read the Report

Innovations in Climate Science

Solar-Powered “Saildrones”

Two solar-powered sail boats are returning to California this month after debuting their ocean monitoring capacity on a trip through the Pacific. These drones are part of a collaboration between NOAA and Alameda-based startup, Saildrone, and they may be able to replace the costly bouy system that scientists currently use to obtain ocean circulation data. The boats collect temperature, wind and solar radiation data, while also measuring ocean circulation currents and gas exchange. These data are more precise than data collected by satellites or buoys and have the potential to provide powerful insights into studies of climate’s impact on ocean circulation.

Autonomous Ice Robots

A squad of “Seaglider” robots have been programmed with navigational algorithms for their year-long journey under Pine Island Glacier in Western Antarctica. Some may sink or get lost in ice caves, but the rest will collect data on salinity, temperature and oxygen content to inform scientific understanding of the rate of ice loss with climate change and implications for sea-level rise, floating to the surface to transmit their data.

Science Funding in the Federal Budget

The omnibus bill passed by Congress and signed by the President last month, did not include the funding cuts to critical climate research that many feared. NOAA received $5.9 billion, which is $234 million above its FY 2017 amount. NOAA has many resources for adaptation professionals and others striving to better understand how the natural world affects their lives and businesses, ranging from its satellite system and weather data to its integrated science programs and US Climate Resilience toolkit. This alphabetized list highlights over 20 such resources.

CRA Webinar: What You Need to Know About TCFD and 2018 Reporting Cycles

Thu, May 10, 2018 1:00 PM – 2:00 PM EDT 
Climate change has become a growing concern for corporations, investors, and financial regulators alike. Corporations need to understand how the impacts of a changing climate may affect company operations or their broader value chain and assess how such impacts should be included in corporate disclosures and sustainability reports.

Emilie Mazzacurati will present an overview of how corporations can identify material risks, provide an update on rising regulatory requirements and changes to voluntary reporting frameworks to align with TCFD recommendations, and highlight opportunities to build resilience and adapt to new market conditions.

This programming is provided exclusively for Corporate Responsibility Association members and invited guests. To RSVP email Jen Boynton at jboynton@3blmedia.com.

Inside the Office at Four Twenty Seven

Four Twenty Seven Website Features New Insights Page

 

Our blog page has been revamped with featured articles at the top and an interactive filter feature that allows users to sort by author, client, media type and theme or to search for keywords.

Our most read publications this month include:

Upcoming Events

Join the Four Twenty Seven team in the field at these upcoming events:

  • April 30 – May 1: 2018 Local Solutions Eastern Climate Preparedness Conference, Manchester, NH: Advisory Services Manager, Katy Maher, will discuss strategies to build local resilience with this convening of government stakeholders.
  • May 1: TCFD US Scenario Analysis Conference, New York, NY: Founder and CEO Emilie Mazzacurati and Chief Development Officer, Frank Freitas, will join this discussion about using scenario analysis in climate-related risk disclosure and resources to help corporations do so.
  • May 10: What You Need to Know About Climate Related Financial Disclosures (TCFD), CRA Webinar: Emilie Mazzacurati is the presenter on this webinar about corporate climate risk disclosure. CRA members only.
  • May 17: GRESB’s Sustainable Real Assets Conference, Washington, DC: Emilie Mazzacurati will keynote GRESB’s annual conference on infrastructure resilience and Chief Development Officer, Frank Freitas will join the convening.
  • May 23: Four Twenty Seven Webinar, 11am-12pm PST: Save the date for a webinar on city level physical climate risks and opportunities to access climate adaptation and resilience financing. Registration details forthcoming.
  • May 31: Advancing TCFD Guidance on Physical Climate Risk and Opportunities, London, UK: Four Twenty Seven is a strategic partner for this event hosted by EBRD and GCECA to discuss emerging guidance on metrics for physical climate risk disclosures and scenario analysis and Emilie Mazzacurati will moderate a panel presenting findings on physical risk metrics.
  • June 5-6: Responsible Investors Europe, London, UK: Hear Emilie Mazzacurati speak on a panel on corporate engagement and also meet with Frank Freitas and Senior Risk Analyst, Léonie Chatain, to discuss ratings and engagement on physical climate risk in equities.
  • June 12-14: VERGE Hawaii, Honolulu, HI: Advisory Services Manager, Kendall Starkman, will join this convening of corporate, government and NGO stakeholders committed to building resilient cities and economies.
  • June 18-21: Adaptation Futures 2018, Cape Town, South Africa: Director of Advisory Services, Yoon Kim, will facilitate a session exploring integrating climate risks into infrastructure investment decisions.
  • June 26: GRESB’s Sustainable Real Assets Conference, Sydney, Australia: Meet with  Frank Freitas at GRESB’s annual conference on resilient infrastructure investments.
  • August 28-29: 3rd California Adaptation Forum, Sacramento, CA: Save the date for this opportunity to join over 600 climate leaders in workshops, sessions and networking around adaptation action in California.
  • September 12-14PRI in Person, San Francisco, CA: Join the Four Twenty Seven team at this annual convening of responsible investment industry leaders.
  • September 12-14: Global Climate Action Summit, San Francisco, CA: Join the Four Twenty Seven team at this convening of global climate adaptation experts meant to propel action around the Paris Agreement.

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Four Twenty Seven sends a newsletter focused on bringing climate intelligence into economic and financial decision-making for Fortune 500 companies, investors, and government institutions.Our mailing address is:
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Fintech Meets Climate Data

We chat with our new Chief Development Officer, Frank Freitas, about his motivations to join Four Twenty Seven after almost 30 years in finance and fintech, and his vision for new products and markets in climate analytics.

Why did you decide to join Four Twenty Seven?

First and foremost, the fact that our firm provides data-driven analytics that quantify real issues facing our planet today is very attractive to me. I have spent my entire career in finance and, like others, have increasingly come to see the need for alignment of investment decisions with those that preserve the future of our planet. To me, Four Twenty Seven’s mission and vision exist at the center of this nexus.

When I encountered the Four Twenty Seven white paper on climate risk in equity markets, I was impressed by the level of thought-leadership embedded in the research, and by the high level of quantitative rigor applied to the development of its risk scores. The acceleration of climate’s influence on corporate performance are upon us, and investors are rapidly awakening to the risks that climate change brings to financial markets. Four Twenty Seven’s sophisticated climate data analytics are at the forefront of identifying the most exposed corporations and assets globally.

My career to date has been focused on the development of analytical solutions for institutional investors, ranging from multi-factor risk models at Barra (now MSCI) to the solutions we built in my previous company, Pluribus Labs, where we combined data science and natural language processing with quantitative modeling to distill a variety of unstructured data sources into investible signals.

In my subsequent conversations with Emilie and the Four Twenty Seven team, I quickly came to realize that Four Twenty Seven’s research methodology really resonated with me, and that the culture here is fabulous. It’s rare that you have an opportunity to do what you love and also provide solutions that impact the planet’s future — my role at Four Twenty Seven enables me to do just that!

How is technology spurring innovation in research around financial risk?

There are a number of drivers at play in this respect.  First and perhaps most obviously, the availability of computing power at our fingertips makes data analysis on large data sets more available and more affordable than ever before.  If you had told me when I started my career that I would be able to create an account on a cloud computing platform like Google’s GCP or Microsoft’s Azure and have massive amounts of compute power available within minutes, I wouldn’t have believed you!  Four Twenty Seven’s ability to distill terabytes of climate data from an ensemble of models into actionable insights at the asset level is a great way to leverage this computing power.

Relatedly, the ubiquity of meaningful data, both unstructured and structured, also provides a much broader set of lenses through which to view the world.  Financial research has always focused on the development of insights from any and all available data sources on companies, industries and economies.  Today, an ever-increasing volume of data sources are accessible for analysis.  For example, features extracted from satellite images of our planet can be used to arrive at estimates on a wide variety of metrics, ranging from crop yields to consumer brand sales changes.  Similarly, observations gleaned from the ‘Internet of Things’ (IoT) can provide us with insights into weather trends and CO2 emissions at the sub-city level.  Moving forward, opportunities afforded by organizations’ self-reporting of their climate risks and mitigation plans specifically related to climate change will provide additional data points for firms like ours to incorporate into our ground truth analysis of companies, industries and economies.

Couple these two trends with increasingly sophisticated machine learning and feature extraction techniques and you wind up with tremendous opportunities to develop insights into both the physical risks of climate change and the steps that companies are taking to mitigate these risks.

What are the priorities during your first year at Four Twenty Seven?

Emilie and the team have translated their broad and deep base of intellectual property into purpose-built solutions for a number of key market segments in the financial sector. These solutions enable asset owners and investors alike to understand their holdings’ exposure to the physical reality of climate change.

Our goals for this year are to continue tuning our existing offerings through engagement with our clients and to position the firm for its next phase of growth.  Thanks to entities like the Task Force on Climate-related Financial Disclosures (TCFD), market participants are increasingly aware of the need to incorporate climate risk analytics into their investment process, and we will continue to evangelize this message in our own interactions with the investment community.  We are currently in fundraising mode and will use proceeds from our capital raise to support plans to leverage our proprietary facility database to quantify the relationship between weather and company performance.  In addition, we intend to on-board additional data sources to inform our analytics and add desktop visualization tools to our client offerings. This promises to be a busy year!

Newsletter: Advancing TCFD Guidance on Physical Climate Risk & Opportunities

 

 

Four Twenty Seven’s monthly newsletter highlights recent developments in climate adaptation and resilience. This month, don’t miss our update on upcoming EU regulations, our analysis on lessons learned from Art. 173 in France, and our conference calendar for the spring!

In Focus: Advancing TCFD Guidance on Physical Climate RIsk and Opportunities

An initiative from the European Bank for Reconstruction and Development and the Global Center for Excellence in Climate Adaptation

The European Bank for Reconstruction and Development (EBRD) and the Global Centre of Excellence on Climate Adaptation (GCECA) are hosting an event: “Advancing TCFD guidance on physical climate risk and opportunities,” which will be held on 31 May at the EBRD’s headquarters in London. This event will be a forum for senior representatives from the financial and business community to discuss and identify the way forward for the development of metrics for disclosing physical climate risk and opportunities, as well as pointers for integrating physical climate risk considerations in scenario-based decision making by businesses and financial institutions.

In preparation for this event, the EBRD has been hosting working groups focused on advancing and fleshing out the recommendations from the Task Force on Climate-related Financial Disclosure’s (TCFD) final recommendations released for the G20 summit last June. The TCFD recommended the inclusion of metrics on physical climate risk and opportunities in financial disclosures and called for further research and concrete guidance on what the appropriate metrics would be.

The conference will feature the findings from expert working groups that include representatives from Allianz, APG, AON, Bank of England, Barclays, BlackRock, Bloomberg, BNP Paribas, Citi, DNB, Deutsche Asset Management, Lightsmith Group, Lloyds, Meridiam Infrastructure, Moody’s, OECD, S&P Global, Shell, Siemens, Standard Chartered, USS and Zurich AM

Four Twenty Seven provides the technical secretariat for this initiative in partnership with Acclimatise. Learn more about the conference: “Advancing TCFD Guidance on Physical Climate Risk & Opportunities.” 

EU Moves Towards Regulation for Climate Risk Disclosure

EC Releases its Action Plan: Financing Sustainable Growth

Earlier this month the EU laid out a clear plan to move towards mandatory climate risk disclosure as part of a new set of regulations to finance sustainable growth and support the transition to a low-carbon economy. The European Commission’s Action Plan lays out a two year timeline for implementation, with a goal to create a taxonomy for climate adaptation finance by the end of 2019. These regulations from the EU will drive change into financial markets globally and set standards on reporting, disclosures and infrastructure resilience that will likely set the bar for the rest of the world.

The EC based the Action Plan on the High-Level Expert Group on Sustainable Finance’s (HLEG) final recommendations for actions to drive the transition to a sustainable financial system. The HLEG was created by the EC in December 2016 to determine how the regulatory landscape should transform to support efforts towards the goals of the Paris agreement and  promote the financing of a sustainable, resource-efficient economy. As the group’s report was eagerly awaited as a blueprint for market transformation in Europe, the EC’s Action Plan is expected to propel that transformation forward while prompting international conversation.

Read the Analysis

Lessons Learned from Article 173 Reporting

How are French investors reporting physical risk?
A Four Twenty Seven analysis

The first year of reporting under Art. 173 in France saw limited uptake of disclosures of physical risk and opportunities. We reviewed disclosures from 50 asset owners in France and found that only a quarter of respondents included substantial analysis and metrics on their exposure to physical impacts of climate change. We find insurance companies AXA and Generali provided the most detailed analysis for property portfolios, while FRR and ERAFP were the only pension funds to provide an initial assessment of physical risk exposure in their equity and fixed income portfolios.

Read the Analysis

More good reads on climate risk disclosures:

Extreme Weather Hurts Corporations

Weather Affects Company Performance

Whether it’s extreme heat diminishing worker productivity, winter storms damaging roads and power lines or one of countless other impacts, extreme weather causes harm to businesses’ facilities, their workers and supply chains, and leads to financial impacts. The World Resources Institute’s recent report, “Water Shortages Cost Indian Energy Companies Billions,” highlights findings that India’s thermal power is so reliant on water for cooling that the largest thermal utilities had to close at least once between 2013-2016 and lost about $1.4 billion in revenue. In the article “5 Things Companies Can Do to Grow in a Water-Stressed World,” Water Deeply describes ways that companies are mitigating their risk by proactively addressing water resource limitations.

Climate-related Risk for Telecommunications

Companies in different sectors will be affected differently by three types of climate risk. Novethic’s article “L’impact des risques climatiques sur les entreprises, le cas d’Orange,” provides direct examples of how physical climate risk, transition risk and reputation/legal risk directly threaten companies. In a discussion of Orange, a telecommunications provider, the article highlights the complex factors that companies must consider in addition to their impact on CO2 emissions. Such considerations include a company’s potential to promote innovations for resilience in society through programs ranging from apps that organize carpooling to smart metering.

Inside the Office at Four Twenty Seven

Meet Guest Researcher, Nora Pankratz

Four Twenty Seven is excited to welcome Nora Pankratz as a guest researcher. Nora is a Ph.D. candidate in Finance at the European Center for Corporate Engagement at Maastricht University in the Netherlands. Her research focuses on the impact of extreme temperatures on the financial performance of public firms. For the next several months Nora will be based in Berkeley, working with data collected by Four Twenty Seven to develop a research project on the translation of climate risks into financial risks.

Upcoming Events

Join the Four Twenty Seven team in the field at these upcoming events:

  • March 19-21: ClimateCon, Asheville, NC: Katy Maher, is at this convening of science and businesses professionals focused on building climate resilience.
  • March 26-27: Financial Risks International Forum, Paris, France: Léonie Chatain, will attend this annual conference on emerging risks in the financial and insurance sectors.
  • April 2:  ICARP TAC Quarterly Meeting, San Francisco, CA: Natalie Ambrosio will participate in the Adaptation Vision Framework workshop hosted by the Governor’s Office of Planning and Research.
  • April 3-6: Sustainatopia, San Francisco, CA: COO Colin Shaw, will speak on a panel on ESG investing and a panel on climate risk at this annual convening of sustainability and financial experts.
  • April 9Financing Climate Change Adaptation, New York, NY: Founder and CEO Emilie Mazzacurati will participate in a private investor workshop on financing adaptation in US cities, organized by C40, NY City and GARI.
  • April 10-11:  Responsible Investors Asia, Tokyo, Japan: Meet with the Four Twenty Seven team to discuss physical climate risk in equities and infrastructure portfolios.
  • May 17: Sustainable Real Assets Conference, Washington, DC: Founder and CEO Emilie Mazzacurati will keynote GRESB’s annual conference on infrastructure resilience.
  • May 31: Advancing TCFD Guidance on Physical Climate Risk and Opportunities, London, UK: Four Twenty Seven is a strategic partner for this event hosted by EBRD and GCECA to discuss emerging guidance on metrics for physical climate risk disclosures and scenario analysis.
  • June 5-6: Responsible Investors Europe, London, UK: Meet with the Four Twenty Seven team to discuss ratings and engagement on physical climate risk in equities.
  • June 18-21: Adaptation Futures 2018, Cape Town, South Africa: Director of Advisory Services, Yoon Kim, will facilitate a session exploring integrating climate risks into infrastructure investment decisions.
  • August 28-293rd California Adaptation Forum, Sacramento, CA: Save the date for this opportunity to join over 600 climate leaders in workshops, sessions and networking around adaptation action in California.

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Four Twenty Seven sends a newsletter focused on bringing climate intelligence into economic and financial decision-making for Fortune 500 companies, investors, and government institutions.Our mailing address is:
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Advancing TCFD Guidance on Physical Climate Risk & Opportunities: An EBRD & GCECA Initiative

The European Bank for Reconstruction and Development (EBRD) and the Global Centre of Excellence on Climate Adaptation (GCECA) have announced an initiative focused on building climate resilience in the financial sector. Throughout the project Four Twenty Seven and our partners, Acclimatise, are supporting the knowledge development on physical climate risk and resilience metrics for the financial sector. The project will culminate in an event in May in London: “Advancing TCFD guidance on physical climate risk & opportunities.”

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The European Bank for Reconstruction and Development (EBRD) and the Global Centre of Excellence on Climate Adaptation (GCECA) are hosting an event: “Advancing TCFD guidance on physical climate risk and opportunities”, which will be held on 31 May at the EBRD’s headquarters in London. This event will build on the recommendations of the Task Force on Climate-related Financial Disclosures (TCFD), which crystallised a growing concern of investors and business leaders over the physical impacts of climate change on the economy and financial markets.

The TCFD’s final recommendations, released for the G20 summit in June 2017, recommended the inclusion of metrics on physical climate risk and opportunities into financial disclosures and called for further research and concrete guidance over what the appropriate metrics should be. Corporations and financial institutions need to agree on common metrics to ensure transparency and data comparability. Since then, the recommendations of the European Union’s High Level Expert Group on sustainable finance, released in January 2018, have also highlighted the need for a common taxonomy on climate change adaptation and metrics for physical climate risk and opportunity disclosures.

This event will be a forum for senior representatives from the financial and business community to discuss and identify the way forward for the development of metrics for disclosing physical climate risk and opportunities, as well as pointers for integrating physical climate risk considerations in scenario-based decision making by businesses and financial institutions.

The conference is sponsored by the EBRD and GCECA, and will feature the findings from expert working groups that include representatives from Allianz, APG, AON, Bank of England, Barclays, BlackRock, Bloomberg, BNP Paribas, Citi, DNB, Deutsche Asset Management, Lightsmith Group, Lloyds, Meridiam Infrastructure, Moody’s, OECD, S&P Global, Shell, Siemens, Standard Chartered, USS and Zurich AM, Acclimatise and 427 are providing the Secretariat function.

A detailed agenda will be circulated in due course. Please note that this is an invitation only event. Additional details are available on EBRD’s event page.

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Contact CEO Emilie Mazzacurati for more information and read about Four Twenty Seven’s solutions to help financial institutions, businesses and governments improve their climate resilience.

Newsletter: Are we doing enough? The state of climate adaptation in the US

 

 

Four Twenty Seven’s monthly newsletter highlights recent developments in climate adaptation and resilience. This month, don’t miss a review of U.S. climate adaptation and a close look at opportunities to build resilience through collaboration.

In Focus: The State of Climate Adaptation


Are we doing enough? How is the field of adaptation developing in the United States? Rising to the Challenge, Together: A Review and Critical Assessment of the State of the US Climate Adaptation Field explores the field’s development, potential and challenges. Commissioned by the Kresge Foundation, the report was co-authored by Susanne C. Moser of Susanne Moser Research and Consulting, Joyce Coffee of Climate Resilience Consulting, and Aleka Seville in her capacity as Four Twenty Seven’s Director of Community Adaptation in 2017.

Based on a literature review and dozens of interviews with thought leaders and adaptation practitioners, this report finds that the emerging field of climate adaptation must continue to develop with increased urgency. Communities across the country are experimenting with adaptation, with the support of a growing knowledge base and suite of tools, and boosted by new actors including utility managers, private sector interests and philanthropy.

However, the field is largely crisis-driven and fails to adequately address the social equity aspects of adaptation choices, that should ensure all people benefit regardless of socio-economic status or race.  It also lacks a shared vision, consistent funding and agreed upon best practices among other shortcomings, the report found. The report recommends aggressive acceleration of adaptation planning, coordination across jurisdictions, and implementation among advocates, planners, and funders. Read more.

Read the Report

The United States of Climate Change


With examples from every state in the U.S. this United States of Climate Change” feature from The Weather Channel displays the vast, dire and varied implications of climate change. It also documents communities’ efforts to adapt to a rapidly changing world. From new species of pathogen-hosting mosquitoes flourishing in Mississippi to “flash droughts” threatening barley in small Montana towns that depend on selling the crop to beer brewers, there is a plethora of local stories highlighting cultural, social and economic impacts of climate change. The Washington Post reports on the thinking behind Weather.com’s framing of this feature.

For more examples of climate change’s local impacts, read about Four Twenty Seven’s work examining the impacts of climate change on Delaware’s workforce and our analysis of extreme heat and public health in Denver.

Working with businesses to build community resilience

As increasing numbers of climate disasters cause over $1 billion in damages, the economic impacts of these events are widespread and ongoing. California wine-growers will feel the financial effects for years as they work to rebuild their vineyards, while the communities that depend on this economy will also feel these consequences. Four Twenty Seven’s blog post “Working with Businesses to Build Community Resilience” outlines opportunities for local governments and businesses to support each other in adaptation efforts.

Businesses and communities depend on each other and have important roles to play in collaborative climate change preparation. While businesses rely on resilient infrastructure and city services, they can also support community recovery efforts and participate in planning. Likewise, local governments can create collaborative networks, share resources and engage businesses. Read more.

Read the Blog

Resources on Engaging Businesses in Adaptation

For more insight on corporate adaptation read the Caring for Climate report, The Business Case for Corporate Adaptation, which highlights the benefits for businesses to build their awareness of climate risk and opportunities for policymakers to encourage corporate adaptation.

Will Amazon HQ2 consider resilience?

Eager for an opportunity for up to 50,000 jobs and a potential $5 billion in investment, twenty cities received the anticipated advancement to the list of finalists for Amazon’s HQ2 last month. Among this short list is the Southeast Florida bid, a collaboration between Broward, Miami-Dade and Palm Beach Counties.

These counties have experience working together through the Southeast Florida Regional Climate Change Compact, which also includes Monroe County. The compact’s Regional Climate Action Plan emphasizes the importance of regional strategies to build resilient economies and communities. Now the benefits of this collaboration are becoming increasingly clear, as many of the regional compact’s priorities, such as addressing sea level rise and improving infrastructure, are also important for bolstering economic success by helping to attract Amazon and other businesses to the region.

Inside the Office at Four Twenty Seven

Meet the Team: Lindsay Ross

Four Twenty Seven is delighted to welcome Lindsay Ross, who joins the team as a Senior Analyst, Macroeconomic Risks. Lindsay analyzes the economic impacts of climate change on corporations and financial markets. She studies at the Johns Hopkins School of Advanced International Studies (SAIS), focusing on Energy, Resources, and the Environment as well as International Finance and Economics. Previously she worked for the U.S. International Trade Commission, assisting with research on the impacts of international trade on the U.S. economy.

Upcoming Events

Join the Four Twenty Seven team in the field at these upcoming events:

  • February 13: Climate Risk: From Assessment to Action, Washington, DC: CEO, Emilie Mazzacurati, will speak on a panel at this workshop hosted by the Inter-American Development Bank
  • February 28 – March 2: Climate Leadership Conference, Denver, CO: Climate Adaptation Senior Analyst, Kendall Starkman, will attend this gathering of climate, sustainability and energy professionals.
  • March 6: Inaugural Conference: Northern European Partnership for Sustainable Finance (NEPSF), London, UK. Emilie Mazzacurati will join the launch of this new Partnership to support sustainable finance.
  • June 18-21: Adaptation Futures 2018, Cape Town, South Africa: Director of Advisory Services, Yoon Kim, will facilitate a session at this conference, exploring integrating climate risks into infrastructure investment decisions.
  • August 28-29: 3rd California Adaptation Forum, Sacramento, CA: Save the date for this opportunity to join over 600 climate leaders in workshops, sessions and networking around adaptation action in California.

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Four Twenty Seven sends a newsletter focused on bringing climate intelligence into economic and financial decision-making for Fortune 500 companies, investors, and government institutions.Our mailing address is:
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Working with Businesses to Build Community Resilience

The year 2017 will stay on the record as one of the most expensive years to date for climate and weather disaster events. The U.S. experienced 16 weather and climate disasters that caused over $1 billion in damages, tying the record year of 2011 for the most billion-dollar disasters. From summer through the fall, wildfires in various parts of California led to fatalities, destruction of entire communities, and damage costs of $18 billion, with economic consequences that will continue to impact the region. These events have highlighted that climate change has already begun to and will continue to impact local communities and businesses, and that local economies will benefit from more coordinated resilience planning.

Communities across the U.S. are taking steps to identify their climate change risks and enhance their resilience to changing climate conditions. Many local governments have assessed their vulnerabilities and are developing resilience plans with support from local stakeholders. However, a key set of stakeholders are often not at the table: businesses. Collaboration between local governments and the business community on climate change resilience remains limited. As local and regional climate change planning continues, it becomes increasingly important for local governments to engage with businesses, both large and small, on these issues.

The success of businesses and communities is intertwined

Many larger companies recognize the impacts of climate change on their operations, including risks to physical assets, disruptions to supply chains, and impacts on their workforce. In fact, some businesses, like Google, are examining how to develop company resilience strategies that address changing climate conditions. Businesses are also dependent on public infrastructure and local government services, and climate risks on these “outside the fence” components are much harder for businesses to evaluate. In fact, a number of companies have highlighted these uncertainties as a major barrier in addressing adaptation.

Local governments are dependent on the private sector in many ways. Businesses are essential to the economic health and growth of communities. Business interruptions can affect the quality of life for residents, disrupt the local economy, and reduce tax revenues. The costs of Hurricane Harvey are still being evaluated, but preliminary estimates suggest that lost economic output from this storm was in the range of $9 billion to $11 billion, including $540 million for goods-producing industries and $141 million for oil and gas industries. The October 2017 wildfires in California’s wine country are estimated to have caused economic losses between $6 and $8 billion dollars due to property damage and business interruptions alone, with $789 million in commercial property claims. These costs do not include the potential losses to the wine industry for many years to come.

Local governments have a strong interest in ensuring that businesses are resilient and remain operational as the climate continues to change. Companies will also benefit from engaging with the public sector on community resilience to enhance their business continuity plans and support their employees. In addition to better protecting their employees and operations, this type of collaboration will help businesses better understand community needs.

Businesses can assist local governments with expertise and solutions

Larger businesses often already understand local risks because of internal risk management processes. Risk management and emergency management plans, along with drills and training exercises with employees, help businesses prepare for extreme events. Local governments can coordinate with businesses on risk management, including participating in drills and trainings, to build and maintain community resilience.

Local governments can also use larger companies’ expertise and data on risk. Businesses may be monitoring information that could be relevant to local resilience planning. For example, utilities often track potential risks to their assets, such as those related to storms (e.g., wind, precipitation, flooding), wildfire, and temperature impacts on energy demand. This information can be helpful to local decision-makers in both emergency management and long-term resilience planning.

The private sector also offers opportunities in services and solutions. Businesses are often interested in developing and improving technologies, engineering approaches, technical assistance, and opportunities to connect with their communities. For example, Airbnb offered disaster relief to people impacted by the California wildfires, connecting displaced residents to available housing. The company also worked with the City of San Francisco’s Department of Emergency Management to share their lessons learned from Superstorm Sandy. Airbnb is also partnering with various local governments to help communities prepare for and recover from disasters. Local governments’ suggestions for climate change solutions and services can help businesses tailor their products to best serve the community.

In addition, financing for implementing community resilience can often be a challenge for local governments. The private sector can offer financing solutions to help fund climate change resilience. For example, Pacific Gas and Electric Company (PG&E) is investing $1 million over five years through their Better Together Resilient Communities grant program to support local climate resilience initiatives in California.

Local governments can share data and information with businesses

Some local governments have undertaken vulnerability assessments and climate change scenario planning for their regions. The data and results from these studies can be shared with businesses to help them understand what assumptions are being used by local governments, and whether their scenarios align, which will be increasingly important to ensure regional coordination as conditions change.

While larger companies may undertake scenario planning and vulnerability assessments, most small businesses do not. However, small businesses can also benefit from data and information sharing. Small companies do not often have the expertise or resources to adequately assess climate change risks and undertake resilience planning. Local governments can share information with small businesses to help them better understand their potential risks and prepare for extreme events. In California, Valley Vision has developed the Capital Region Business Resiliency Initiative to help engage the small business community in resilience planning. This effort helps small businesses engage with local stakeholders to understand potential risks and provides resources to help these businesses plan for disaster resilience.

Local governments can engage with businesses through existing networks or by creating new processes to assist with engagement

Local governments can engage with both small and large businesses through networks and organizations for the private sector, like local chambers of commerce, trade associations, and other business networking groups. For example, the City of Annapolis has engaged the Anne Arundel County Chamber of Commerce and the Downtown Annapolis Partnership in its Weather It Together initiative, which is focused on adapting the historic community to minimize the risks associated with flooding. Through this effort, local businesses are part of the planning process to help the community become more resilient. The City of Cambridge, Massachusetts has also engaged businesses in long-term planning efforts like the Cambridge Compact and the city’s Climate Change Preparedness & Resilience Plan. Establishing public-private partnerships focused on climate resilience will also help to facilitate conversations and collaboration between these two sectors.

Local governments may already engage with businesses individually, but it can be helpful to set up an ongoing process for involving the private sector in resilience planning. For example, business representatives can participate in local planning and advisory committees, contributing their perspectives and identifying any key issues for the business community. Effectively engaging the business community will often require targeted outreach and potentially different strategies, as businesses may not be aware of ongoing stakeholder processes or may not realize their relevance to company needs. Some communities have incorporated businesses into resilience planning through regional climate collaboratives. Several regional climate collaboratives in California focus on engaging different stakeholder groups, including businesses, to further climate change planning. For example, the Sierra Climate Adaptation and Mitigation Partnership was founded by the Sierra Business Council and has various business members, including ski resorts and forestry companies.

Effectively preparing for climate change’s impacts requires that cities coordinate with many different stakeholders. Businesses, public agencies, community groups, and citizens are all important to the discussion on community resilience, as they will all be impacted by climate change and have important ideas to contribute. Engaging the private sector is an important way for local governments to improve community resilience, and will benefit both the public and private sector through information sharing, aligning needs and goals, and developing multi-sector networks.

Towards a Resilient Financial Sector: an Initiative from the European Bank of Reconstruction and Development

Four Twenty Seven provides the technical secretariat for the European Bank for Reconstruction and Development (EBRD) and Global Centre of Excellence on Climate Adaptation (GCECA) initiative focused on building climate resilience in the financial sector.   Over the coming months, Four Twenty Seven and our partners, Acclimatise, will be releasing briefing papers on physical climate risk and resilience metrics for the financial sector. The project will culminate in an event in May 2018 in London: “Towards a Resilient Financial Sector: Disclosing Physical Climate Risk & Opportunities”.

Read EBRD’s full press release below:

“The EBRD is partnering with the Global Centre of Excellence on Climate Adaptation (GCECA) in a joint initiative to help strengthen the resilience of the financial sector to the impacts of climate change.

Investors and businesses are becoming increasingly aware of the need to understand and manage the risks associated with climate change. In order to explore options for addressing these issues, the EBRD and GCECA will organise a conference entitled “Towards a Resilient Financial Sector: Disclosing Physical Climate Risk & Opportunities”, to be held at the EBRD’s London Headquarters on 31 May 2018.

The conference will bring together the financial, technical and policy perspectives to shape market action on climate resilience. The focus will be on improving financial sector awareness of climate risks and their impacts on investments, as well as facilitating the emergence of climate risk and resilience metrics, and identifying ways on which investors and businesses can integrate climate change intelligence into their business strategies and investment planning.

Announcing the cooperation Craig Davies, EBRD Head of Climate Resilience Investments, said: “We are very pleased to partner with the GCECA, the first international institution with a specific focus on climate change adaptation. Building climate resilient economies requires broad market action by businesses and investors, alongside effective government policies. We see great opportunities for working with the GCECA and a wider range of other stakeholders to enable businesses and investors to realise the value that can be created through building climate resilience.”

“We are grateful that the Paris Agreement has put Climate Adaptation on a par with mitigation but there is a long way to go. Understanding Climate Adaptation is crucial if we want to put paper into practice.”
Christiaan Wallet, Operations Director of GCECA

The announcement was made today in Bonn at the COP23 climate conference which this year is focussing on the implementation of the 2015 Paris Agreement on climate change. The EBRD is organising four panels on key climate issues and Bank representatives are also taking part in many more events.

The EBRD is a major investor in climate finance in many of the 38 emerging economies where it works, a driving force in energy efficiency projects, a pioneer in the development of renewable energy sources and an increasingly important player in adaptation to climate change, having signed almost 180 climate resilience investment since 2011. Under its Green Economy Transition (GET) approach, the EBRD aims to dedicate 40 per cent of its annual investment to green finance by 2020 and is well on the way to achieving this objective.

The Global Centre of Excellence on Climate Adaptation helps countries, institutions and businesses to adapt to a warming climate, which is increasing the frequency of natural disasters and causing economic disruptions. It is bringing together international partners, including leading knowledge institutes, businesses, NGOs, local and national governments, international organisations and financial institutions. A technical secretariat has been created and funded by the EBRD.”

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Contact CEO Emilie Mazzacurati for more information and read about Four Twenty Seven’s solutions to help financial institutions, businesses and governments improve their climate resilience.

Newsletter: COP23 Preview – Climate Risk Disclosure and Adaptation Finance

Four Twenty Seven’s monthly newsletter highlights recent developments in climate adaptation and resilience. This month, don’t miss the highlights from the UN Principles for Responsible Investment conference and our preview of COP 23 in Bonn next month!

In Focus: A New Way to Fund Resilience


Re:focus Partners’ new report, A Guide to Public-Sector Resilience Bond Sponsorship, highlights the potential of resilience bonds to decrease both financial and physical disaster risks. By partnering with insurance agencies and issuing bonds to fund projects that are targeted at reducing specific vulnerabilities, such as flooding, city and state governments can make their communities more resilient while saving money. The report explains hazard-specific projects applicable for resilience bonds and outlines potential strategies for partnerships. Watch Four Twenty Seven CEO Emilie Mazzacurati speak on resilience finance at a Proadapt Symposium on Climate Risk and Investment.

Mainstreaming Climate Risk Disclosures

 

Climate risk reporting was at the heart of the Principles for Responsible Investment (PRI) in Person conference in Berlin. Nicolas Moreau, head of Deutsche Asset Management, encouraged investors to emphasize physical risk assessment in their portfolios in a keynote presentation featured above. Four Twenty Seven is proud to partner with Deutsche Asset Management to power new investment strategies focused on physical risk mitigation. Read about Four Twenty Seven’s work evaluating physical risk and supporting resilience in the financial sector. At the conference, PRI also announced the Climate Action 100+ initiative in collaboration with Asia Investor Group on Climate Change (AIGCC), Ceres, Investor Group on Climate Change and Institutional Investors Group on Climate Change (IIGCC).The five-year initiative will engage investors to urge top greenhouse gas emitters to decrease emissions, commit to climate risk disclosure and improve corporate governance related to climate change.

Looking Over the Horizon


The new C2ES report, Beyond the Horizon: Corporate Reporting on Climate Change, offers insight into the Task Force on Climate-related Financial Disclosure’s (TCFD) final recommendations. The report praises the recommendations’ balance, noting their appeal to investors needing more information and to companies needing flexibility. Read our analysis of the TCFD Recommendations and applicable regulation in Europe.

Early Movers


The Climate Disclosure Standards Board’s announced ten companies committed to implementing the TCFD’s recommendations within three years. This emphasis on climate risk disclosure allows for the best use of capital and supports the transition to a resilient, low-carbon world. This commitment also sets companies apart in the eyes of investors, improves their own resilience and guarantees them support from CDSB.

The Costs of Climate Change

Billion-dollar Weather Events


Recent storms join a landscape that’s increasingly dotted with widespread costly disasters. National Geographic’s Billion-dollar Weather Chart displays these events as semi-circles, color-coded by event type and sized according to the economic damage caused, and serves as a comprehensive calendar of decades of extreme weather events.

Thought Leadership: Economic Impacts of Extreme Weather Events

Four Twenty Seven advisor, Kate Gordon urges leaders to plan for climate change and build for resilience in her commentary on CNBC: Evacuating millions is not an ‘effective or sustainable’ response to hurricane threats.

Solomon Hsiang from UC Berkeley and Trevor Houser from Rhodium Group emphasize the importance of giving financial support to Puerto Rico in their New York Times op-ed, Don’t Let Puerto Rico Fall Into an Economic Abyss.

In his opinion piece in the Washington Post, What’s behind today’s job report? Hurricanes, low unemployment, wage growth and climate change, Jared Bernstein discusses the connections between storms and a low job report.

Four Twenty Seven at COP 23

Join Nik Steinberg, Four Twenty Seven’s Director of Analytics, at these events in Bonn, Germany for COP23.

Resilience as a Business: How the Private Sector Can Turn Climate Risk into Business and Investment  Nov. 10, 5:30 – 8:00pm, Hilton Bonn

Bringing together corporate stakeholders and private investors this event will explore the private sector’s pivotal role in mainstreaming adaptation and driving the resilience agenda.

Speakers include: Representative from Ministry of Economy, Trade, and Industry of Japan; Mari Yoshitaka from Mitsubishi UFJ Morgan Stanley Securities Co. Ltd.; Jay Koh from Lightsmith Group and GARI;  Nik Steinberg from Four Twenty Seven; and Amal-Lee Amin from Inter-American Development Bank. For more information contact proadapt@fomin.org

Measuring Progress on Climate Adaptation and Resilience: From Concepts to Practical Applications Nov. 7, 3:00-4:30pm, Meeting Room 7 (150)

Director of Analytics, Nik Steinberg will join a panel of experts discussing adaptation measurement, focusing on indicators and metrics to inform and assess resilience efforts.  This side event will be hosted by the International Development Research Centre (IDRC), Asian Institute of Technology (AIT), McGill University and the University of Notre Dame.

The costs of extreme climatic events for the financial sector: how to manage exposure? November 10, French Pavilion

Director of Analytics, Nik Steinberg will speak on a panel hosted by the Institute for Climate Economics (I4CE), discussing the financial impacts of extreme weather events and strategies to build resilience.

Finance and Resilience Side Events

Climate Action in Financial Institutions: Mainstreaming the Paris Agreement in the Financial Sector Thursday Nov 9, 3:00-4:30pm, Meeting Room 7 (150)
Hosted by the Institute for Climate Economics (I4CE), Corporacion Andina de Fomenta (CAF) and European Investment Bank (EIB).

Excellence in Climate Adaptation Nov 9, 3:00-4:30pm, Meeting Room 10 (200)
United by their vision to unite global adaptation projects, the Netherlands, Japan and UN Environment created The Global Center of Excellence on Climate Adaptation (GCECA), which will co-host this event with the Red Cross Red Crescent Climate Centre.

Innovative Climate Finance Strategies and Instruments by and for Climate-Vulnerable Countries Monday Nov 13, 4:45-6:15pm, Meeting Room 9 (100)
Hosted by the Institute for Climate and Sustainable Cities (ICSC), Bangladesh Centre for Advanced Studies (BCAS) and the Philippines.

Role of Standards and Accreditation to Support Non-state Actors in Light of Paris Agreement and SDGs Friday Nov 17, 1:15-2:45pm, Meeting Room 1 (150)
Hosted by the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) and International Accreditation Forum Inc. (IAF).

Four Twenty Seven: Meet the Team!

Katy Maher, Manager

Four Twenty Seven is proud to announce the addition of Katy Maher to the team. From our new location in Washington, D.C., Katy works closely with Four Twenty Seven’s public and private sector clients to conduct vulnerability assessments, develop resilience strategies and facilitate stakeholder workshops.

Katy brings more than ten years of experience supporting climate change impacts and resilience projects at international, federal, state and local levels. Her expertise also includes convening public and private sector organizations to facilitate discussion and planning on climate resilience. Prior to joining Four Twenty Seven, Katy coordinated resilience projects at the Center for Climate and Energy Solutions (C2ES) and ICF International.

Read more of Katy’s experience

Career Opportunities

Four Twenty Seven continues to grow! We are hiring for the following positions:

* Senior Analyst, Financial Climate Risk
* Business Development Manager (Paris)
* Business Data Analyst

See the position descriptions.

Upcoming Events

Join the Four Twenty Seven team in the field at these upcoming events:

  • October 10-13  SOCAP 2017, San Francisco, California: Meet with Senior Analyst Kendall Starkmann and Director of Advisory Yoon Kim to discuss impact investments and adaptation finance.
  • November 4-8  APHA 2017, Atlanta, Georgia: Director of Analytics Nik Steinberg will discuss how climate change affects health and how climate science can support decision-making in the public health sector at the APHA’s annual meeting and expo.
  • November 7-17  COP23, Bonn, Germany: Join Director of Analytics Nik Steinberg at side events at the UNFCCC’s 23rd Conference of Parties (See above for details).
  • December 6-7  RI Americas 2017, New York, New York: CEO Emilie Mazzacurati and COO Colin Shaw will attend the annual conference where Four Twenty Seven will have a booth and Emilie will present on Physical Climate Risk in Equity Portfolios.
  • December 11-15  AGU Fall Meeting, New Orleans, Louisiana: Director of Analytics Nik Steinberg will be joining the Earth and Space Science community to discuss recent research trends and participate in a mix of presentations, lectures and networking opportunities.

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Newsletter: How to disclose climate risk and opportunities?

 

 


Four Twenty Seven Climate Solutions

TCFD Releases Final Recommendations

The Financial Stability Board’s Task Force on Climate-related Financial Disclosures (TCFD) released their final recommendations in late July. The changes to the recommendations reflect the extensive feedback the Tasforce received from the stakeholder engagement process in the past six months. Key changes include:

  • Simplifying the recommended disclosure related to Strategy and scenarios to focus on the resiliency of an organization’s strategy to climate risk and opportunities
  • Establishing a threshold for organizations that should consider conducting more robust scenario analysis to assess the resilience of their strategies.
  • Clarifying that the recommended disclosures related to the strategy and metrics and targets recommendations depend on an assessment of materiality, whereas disclosures on governance and risk management are relevant for all organizations.
  • Updated conceptual map of climate-related risks and opportunities and associated financial impacts.


The recommendations were presented at the G20 summit in Hamburg, Germany last week, with hopes that the world leaders would formally endorse the guidelines. Climate change was high on the agenda for the summit, where all but the United States voiced a strong re-commitment to the goals of the Paris Agreement, and the G20 included by reference the TCFD recommendations in the Climate and Energy Action Plan for Growth.

CEOs Endorse TCFD recommendations

The TCFD final recommendations were endorsed by over 100 CEO’s from a wide range of companies, including large financial institutions like Barclays and Morgan Stanley as well as energy and manufacturing companies like Suez, DuPont, and Unilever. Reactions from a broad range of financial analysts was also positive, noting the need for improvements and wider adoption of climate risk disclosure practices.

A number of initiatives are already under way to think through and plan the implementation of the TCFD recommendations, such as the UNEP FI’s effort with major banks from around the world who have pledged to work towards adopting these recommendations, and put forth actions they see as needed for broader adoption of climate risk reporting.

Further readings:

  • The Economist Intelligence Unit’s  “The Road to Action” report finds that investors, asset managers, and banks are in urgent need of a way to identify and measure how the industry is responding to climate-related risks. It notes that their interviewees widely regard these recommendations as having the clearest mandate to providing possible solutions.
  • Aon’s white paper Financial Regulators Awaken: Prepare to Disclose Climate Risk notes that risk management and analytics is what differentiates the TCFD’s recommendations from many existing standards. “Risk management, including insurance and risk analytics, is given a key role in helping businesses understand and quantify climate risks. The recommendations provide a framework that can enhance risk management, empower corporate strategy, and improve resilience in a fast-changing world.”
  • The 2-Degree Investing Initiative takes a deep dive into corporate disclosures in its forthcoming report “Limited Visibility”, part of their Tragedy of the Horizon program. The report presents the current state of corporate disclosure on long-term risks and long-term forward looking data using analysis of MSCI World companies’ financial disclosures.

Climate Change in the Boardroom: Towards Climate-Competent Boards


What is a climate-competent board, and why does having one matter? Four Twenty Seven CEO Emilie Mazzacurati was invited to speak on exactly that during the Investing in the Age of Climate Change symposium at the University of Oregon. The symposium tackled issues around climate risk, their connection to investment decisions, and the need to understand how these risks can affect an organization’s business in the long-term. Emilie delved into the climate-competent board and presented on the opportunities they provide, and steps to implement climate-competency on a board. Watch the presentation, delivered via webcam.

How Much Will Climate Change Cost in the United States?

A new research article in Science magazine reveals that in the decades ahead, climate change will affect parts of the United States differently. The study found that areas in the Midwest and Southeast will likely suffer more economic harm from climate change with some areas possibly benefiting from the wild winters. The researchers hope to continue working on this study to further provide more specifics in individual areas to help local policymakers prepare for the incoming risks.

Join the Team!

Four Twenty Seven is hiring! We are looking for Business Development Managers (Europe and US), as well as talented analysts with a background in economics, econometrics, and data analysis. See the position descriptions.

Upcoming Events

Join the Four Twenty Seven team in the field at these upcoming events:

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TCFD Releases Final Recommendations

Conceptual map of climate-related risks, opportunities, and financial impacts, from the final TCFD recommendations report

The Financial Stability Board’s Task Force on Climate-related Financial Disclosures (TCFD) released their final recommendations in late June. The changes to the recommendations reflect the extensive feedback the Taskforce received from the stakeholder engagement process in the past six months. Some key changes include:

  • Simplifying the recommended disclosure related to Strategy and scenarios to focus on the resiliency of an organization’s strategy to climate risk and opportunities
  • Establishing a threshold for organizations that should consider conducting more robust scenario analysis to assess the resilience of their strategies.
  • Clarifying that the recommended disclosures related to the strategy and metrics and targets recommendations depend on an assessment of materiality, whereas disclosures on governance and risk management are relevant for all organizations.
  • Updated conceptual map of climate-related risks and opportunities and associated financial impacts.

TCFD Recommendations at G20

The recommendations were presented at the G20 summit in Hamburg, Germany, with hopes that the world leaders would formally endorse the guidelines. Climate change was high on the agenda for the summit, where all but the United States voiced a strong recommitment to the goals of the Paris Agreement, and the G20 included by reference, the TCFD recommendations in their Climate and Energy Action Plan for Growth.

CEOs Endorse the Recommendations

The TCFD final recommendations were endorsed by over 100 CEO’s from a wide range of companies, including large financial institutions like Barclays and Morgan Stanley as well as energy and manufacturing companies like Suez, DuPont, and Unilever. Reactions from a broad range of financial analysts were also positive, noting the need for improvements and wider adoption of climate risk disclosure practices.

A number of initiatives are already under way to think through and plan the implementation of the TCFD recommendations, such as the UNEP FI’s effort with major banks from around the world who have pledged to work towards adopting these recommendations, and put forth actions they see as needed for broader adoption of climate risk reporting.

Further Readings

  • The Economist Intelligence Unit’s  “The Road to Action” report finds that investors, asset managers, and banks are in urgent need of a way to identify and measure how the industry is responding to climate-related risks. It notes that their interviewees widely regard the TCFD’s recommendations as having the clearest mandate to providing possible solutions.
  • Aon’s white paper Financial Regulators Awaken: Prepare to Disclose Climate Risk notes that risk management and analytics is what differentiates the TCFD’s recommendations from many existing standards. “Risk management, including insurance and risk analytics, is given a key role in helping businesses understand and quantify climate risks. The recommendations provide a framework that can enhance risk management, empower corporate strategy, and improve resilience in a fast-changing world.”
  • The 2-Degree Investing Initiative takes a deep dive into corporate disclosures in its forthcoming report “Limited Visibility”, part of their Tragedy of the Horizon program. The report presents the current state of corporate disclosure on long-term risks and long-term forward looking data using analysis of MSCI World companies’ financial disclosures.

Four Twenty Seven helps investors, Fortune 500 companies, and government institutions understand how to quantify and monetize climate change impacts on operations and asset portfolios. Our clients rely on Four Twenty Seven’s tools and models to factor into financial and operational planning processes. Learn more about how we are helping our clients assess and adapt to climate risks.